Adjusting my water


joshua
Gold
Gold
United States of America
Posts: 2663
Joined: 7 years ago
Region: USA & Canada
Preferred Brewing Method: Single-Vessel All-Grain (SVA)
City:

Post by joshua » 3 years ago

Is the a scale to measure mg???? or do I need 1000L to add 1 gram???
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.

User avatar

Rick
Gold
Gold
United States of America
Posts: 760
Joined: 4 years ago
Location: Pennsylvania
Region: USA & Canada
Preferred Brewing Method: Single-Vessel All-Grain (SVA)
City: East Greenville

Post by Rick » 3 years ago

joshua wrote:Is the a scale to measure mg???? or do I need 1000L to add 1 gram???
1 gram of a typical brewing salt often addressees more than a single mineral, so I guess this isn't a practical way to try to wrap or heads around additions?

Not going to lie, I probably trust brun'water far more than I should. I hope one day to delve deeper into the actual science. I see there are online courses for brewing chemistry, but I need to brush up on basic chem before committing to that.
Last edited by Rick on 16 Sep 2014, 04:32, edited 1 time in total.


joshua
Gold
Gold
United States of America
Posts: 2663
Joined: 7 years ago
Region: USA & Canada
Preferred Brewing Method: Single-Vessel All-Grain (SVA)
City:

Post by joshua » 3 years ago

Rick, I remember the Phrases..."If you Water is worth drinking, then it is worth Brewing" and "If want to have A good English Bitters, go to England"
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.

User avatar

Rick
Gold
Gold
United States of America
Posts: 760
Joined: 4 years ago
Location: Pennsylvania
Region: USA & Canada
Preferred Brewing Method: Single-Vessel All-Grain (SVA)
City: East Greenville

Post by Rick » 3 years ago

Haha, I'm far too German to limit myself to blanket statements. It's likely more a curse than anything else.

User avatar

Rick
Gold
Gold
United States of America
Posts: 760
Joined: 4 years ago
Location: Pennsylvania
Region: USA & Canada
Preferred Brewing Method: Single-Vessel All-Grain (SVA)
City: East Greenville

Post by Rick » 3 years ago

onkeltuka wrote:Getting back to this water stuff. One thing I can't get my mind around is this: when calculating mineral additions in BW, I calculate the mineral amounts based on the TWN, but once I'm done boiling I might have only 60% liquid of that left, so won't I end up with hugely concentrated amount of minerals in that smaller volume of wort?

Found this response today from the Martin, figured it would be a great addition to this thread.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/brun-wa" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... ost6581444
Yes, you are reading too much into the importance of calcium and the resulting concentration of ions through the boil. Trying to extrapolate what the ionic concentrations are after the boil is full of potential error since one brewer's boil may not be similar to another. In addition, we need to understand that malt adds a LOT of ionic content to the wort.

You can brew with distilled water and still have a bunch of calcium in your wort. The issue is that we brewers have empirically found that having around 50 ppm calcium in the starting water is good for helping ale yeast flocculate. Most brewers like their beers to clear in a reasonable amount of time. Conversely, lager brewers are not as interested in quick flocculation since they lager their beers and the yeast will fall out of suspension eventually.

So, 50 ppm is not a sacred level of calcium for brewing water. There is more than that level in wort made with distilled water and the yeast need very little calcium for their health.

Now I do have a minimum calcium level that most brewers should strive for and that is to provide at least 40 ppm IN THE MASH to help precipitate oxalate from the wort. That oxalate can cause beerstone problems around the brewery and it MIGHT promote kidney stones in beer drinkers if not precipitated (inconclusive). So you can have this minimum level in the mash and then dilute it with low calcium water and the beer will turn out fine. Some lagers benefit from low mineralization while other beers have improved flavor with more mineralization (ie: pale ales).

So, its not worthwhile to consider the concentrating effects of the boil on ions. Just standardize on targeting pre-boil concentrations in your water and alter those concentrations with subsequent brews to produce the results you prefer.

Don't overthink it! Enjoy.
Last edited by Rick on 23 Dec 2014, 23:56, edited 1 time in total.

Post Reply

Return to “Brewing Water”

Brewers Online

Brewers browsing this forum: No members and 1 guest