Late Wort Hopping

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Late Wort Hopping

Post by joshua » 3 years ago

Late Wort Hopping

There is a way to add Hop bitterness, Flavor, or Amorma AFTER the Boil is finish.

Below is the data about the Most Important Hop Oils used in BEER Brewing.

Essential oils
Alpha acids

The alpha acids are the hop components most familiar to home brewers. Every package of hops sold to homebrewers indicates the alpha acid percentage to allow the brewer to calculate the bitterness he or she wants in the finished beer. The alpha acid percentage represents the amount of the hop, by weight, that is composed of alpha acids.

Humulone
Humulone (R=isovaleryl) is the primary alpha acid occurring in most hops. It is thought to give a desirable "soft" bittering to the finished beer.
Melts above 153F/67C, Never boils off

Cohumulone
Cohumulone (R=isobutyryl) has been considered to add a harsh, unpleasant bitterness to beer, and so low-cohumulone varieties were considered more desirable for brewing purposes; most noble hops have relatively low cohumulone. For this reason, cohumulone is often the only alpha acid identified specifically by hop producers. Cohumulone is indicated as a percentage (by weight) of the total alpha acid content of a hop.
Melts above 158F/70C, Never boils off


Adhumulone
Adhumulone (R=2-methylbutyryl), which usually occurs in relatively small amounts. Its effect on bitterness and flavor is not well understood.
Melts above 208F/96C, Never boils off

Each alpha acid has a corresponding iso-alpha acid. The iso-alpha acid isohumulone, the isomerized form of humulone, is important to brewers because it reacts with riboflavin in the presence of light to form MBT to form a skunk-like flavor and odor.

While alpha acids contribute most of the bitterness to beer, most of the hop flavor and aroma is contributed by volatile essential oils. Hop producers generally indicate the total percentage of essential oils by weight in a given hop, and sometimes identify specific oils by percentage of total oil.

Because hop oils are highly volatile, traditionally the aroma and flavor characteristics of hops were obtained by late hop additions or dry hopping, allowing the oils to be absorbed into the wort but not leaving them in the boil long enough to boil off. Traditionally flavor additions were made in the last fifteen minutes or less of the boil, while aroma additions were made with five minutes or less of boil remaining. However, recently home and craft brewers have been experimenting with the recently rediscovered technique of first wort hopping, which allows hops added early in the brewing process to survive the boil and lend flavor and aroma to the finished beer.

Beta acids
The principal hop essential oils are:

Humulene
Humulene is thought to lend the distinctive "noble" character to noble hops; most varieties traditionally considered noble are high in humulene, while many bittering hop varieties have very low levels. The noble character is strongest when the hops are used in dry hopping or late hop additions; if boiled for longer periods, humulene lends the finished beer an herbal or spicy character.
Melts above 168F/75C, Boils off at 194F/90C
http://beerlegends.com/humulene-oil" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Myrcene
Myrcene yields flavors that were not traditionally considered desirable by European brewers, and noble hops are very low in myrcene. However, many American hop varieties are very high in myrcene; it makes up up to 60% of total oil in Cascade and up to 70% in Amarillo. Also found in some citrus fruits, myrcene lends American hops many of their distinctive flavors.
Melts above 80F/26C, Boils off at 120F/50C
http://beerlegends.com/myrcene-oil" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

When added late in, or after, the boil, Myrcene adds the intense, pungent aroma associated with American dry-hopped beers. When boiled for longer periods, it yields the characteristic citrus and pine aromas of American craft beer.

Caryophyllene
Caryophyllene adds a spicy, herbal character similar to humulene when boiled. Its effect on flavor when fresh is not well understood.
Melts above 130F/52C, Boils off at 205F/96C
http://beerlegends.com/caryophyllene-oil" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Farnesene
Farnesene makes up a very low percentage of total oil in most hop varieties. However, it is considered significant because it makes up a substantial proportion of some noble hops. Its effect on flavor and aroma is unknown.
Melts above 190F/85C, Never boils off
http://beerlegends.com/farnesene-oil" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The data shows the Bitterness and Flavor oils can be used After the Boil.

I found that when the Boil is finished, there is time to take a sample of the wort, and taste it.

When I find the Bitterness or Flavor is not what I hoped for, I can Add more hops in a bag to the Wort and Increase to flavor, or even add a new flavor to the wort.

I also have added more bitterness, BY TASTE, to the Wort, when I need more.

To add more Aroma, I found that letting the wort cool below 158F/70C, I can add the Aroma Hops, and wait until the Aroma smell is at a great level.

I found it is best to "Rapid chill" the Wort after these additions to lock the character into the Wort.


For a list of Hops with Oils listed see...

https://www.usahops.org/cabinet/data/20 ... 281%29.pdf

If your Slow at No-chill or a bit Slower at Whirlpooling and Chilling, you may want to try Hop Standing.

See http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Or A good Forum Read about Hop Stands is at http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/f" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... opic=153.0

And a LONG forum read at http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtop" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... =5&t=76188

There is a discussion on "Hop Back" and "Hop Stand" can be found at http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/f" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... opic=153.0

Our Member, Argon5000 wrote a topic "Late Hopping and No Chilling Guide on the Other Aussie forum http://aussiehomebrewer.com/topic/55801" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; ... ing-guide/


More In the Future.....
Last edited by joshua on 14 Feb 2017, 02:09, edited 8 times in total.
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Post by BobBrews » 3 years ago

Joshua,

Great Job! Lots of information and a good post to book mark! Thanks for all the effort. Have a beer on me!
Last edited by BobBrews on 12 Aug 2013, 06:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Yeasty » 3 years ago

:think: :think: Interesting post there Joshua. Short, simple and to the point. :shoot:
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Post by joshua » 3 years ago

BUMP....post #1 is updated.

If you need more Information about "Late wort Hopping" or "hop Bursting" check out Mr. Malty's opinion at http://www.mrmalty.com/late_hopping.php it is a good read!
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Post by nosco » 2 years ago

Thanks joshua. Just what I was looking for.
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Post by jhough » 2 years ago

Thanks for posting this Joshua, I've been looking for a way to better understand which
oils do what in the process. Now we have it in one place. BOOKMARKED !


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Post by joshua » 2 years ago

Your Welcome Guys,

The late wort Hopping can be tested by Taste, every 10-15 minutes, and you can Pull the Hop Bag, or Go and Chill it to Fermentation.
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Post by Mad_Scientist » 2 years ago

Who can find our two favorite terpenes in this list? ;
http://steephilllab.com/resources/canna ... nce-guide/


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Post by joshua » 2 years ago

MS, Humulene and Myrcene, The two Good things about Hops, and Dope!

Maybe, someday, Pot and Hops will work in Beer.
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Post by Mad_Scientist » 2 years ago

Maybe we can get 2trout to try it?

http://sensiseeds.com/en/blog/brew-cannabis-beer/


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Post by joshua » 2 years ago

Wow, double DUI, Stoned and Drunk at the same time, with only one beverage!!
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Post by DanIAm » 2 years ago

On the farnesene that you mention...

My neighbour is a fan of Carlton Draught (there is no explaining taste...)

I was happy to give him a hand in moving from kits to all grain, but there was no point as he wants Carlton clones. But he wasn't satisfied with the variations on kits, the clones were miles from the store bought products.

So I've moved him to bulk malt, isohops and we've been trying a variety of different yeasts, mostly to do with what will withstand the vagaries of his shed climate where his fermenters are out in the open. We don't bother boiling the malt, all we do is pour a 15kg briess growler of malt extract into his fermentor, water it to 30 litres and put 10 litres back into the growler (pastuerise it with my urn) for future brew and 10 litres into his 2nd fermentor, top both up to 50, add a bottle of isohops to each with yeast and off it goes.

Cutting a long story short... The brewery uses isohops for this beer, so we use isohops. We're decently close to the original using this isohop http://www.grainandgrape.com.au/product ... EXT+7.5+ML

The stuff is powerful, 7.5ml into his 50l brews. Periodically he will add 1 drop of isohop into his stein to up the bitterness according to his whims.


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Post by joshua » 2 years ago

DanIam, those Iso-Hops are becoming a good thing. It makes adding bitterness,and flavor very easy.

They also leave out the oils that lead to Skunky-ness and Staling.

It really helps, by saving us from figuring out what hops are best for bitterness, and flavor, and avoid those that go bad over time.
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Post by DanIAm » 2 years ago

joshua wrote:DanIam, those Iso-Hops are becoming a good thing. It makes adding bitterness,and flavor very easy.
Heya Joshua, no argument there from me.

I've found it to be consistent and reliable.

For my own beermaking, I'll stick to the oldfangled process because the variations are part of the fun of cooking, that and the aromas on brewday. But I wouldn't hesitate to use isohops if a brew proved underhopped, either opening up the keg and squeezing some in or a drop in every glass.

As for my neighbour, he is in heaven as we've cracked the beer atom and can give him his personal ambrosia :yum:
Last edited by DanIAm on 28 Mar 2015, 21:58, edited 2 times in total.


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Post by joshua » 2 years ago

Good Day,

To not go over the Moon, or promote any Products or Companies, but,

To find more information on Hop Products that may be used AFTER the Boil..see

http://hopsteiner.com/products-brewing-products/

BobBrews Hop Vodka, is so Over.

see http://www.biabrewer.info/viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2951
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Post by nosco » 2 years ago

I think Bob should have patented his hop vodka. I noticed that Dan Murphys is selling hopped bitters. Only available by delivery so a bit overpriced.
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Re: Late Wort Hopping

Post by Jamato » 2 months ago

I am in my second batch of FWH
As far as I can tell, my first batch, I call it a Rye Ale. came out real good, the bitter is just right
However this has never been a real bitter beer, I use the uniqueness of the rye taste to help balance the malt
My wife did want to know if it was a new recipe however so there was a difference, I found the bitter to be smoother, however using MT hood to bitter this beer and Saaz to finish it I do not have a aggressive bittering hop in it.

The brew I did yesterday will be a better example, a continental style lager, but that will be 6 weeks till we sample that

I have read the pros and the cons on FWH all over the place and do realize the jury is still out on this one. Most of my beers are lagers however and heavy hopping is not huge in the style. I think when I do an ESB or a Blonde Ale I will get results more about the harshness of the bitter.

I will keep posting after each brew. this is a subject worth keeping up on
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Re: Late Wort Hopping

Post by Scott » 2 months ago

Yeah Jamato, please do...! As you know, this topic really interests me as well.

I don't think I've ever had anything that would be a problem with FWH...no real disadvantages. Maybe some questions if - for certain - it is truly effective or not (to create smooth bitterness without bitterness). Certainly made good beer with it. But would it have been as good without FWH...? :think: I don't know.

Realistically we need to do some side-by-side testing, along with triangle tests to confirm this (I think). And I don't have two sets of identical equipment to conduct the testing...


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Re: Late Wort Hopping

Post by Jamato » 2 months ago

Scott
I totally agree about the need for side by side brews and testing
I think this is a subject that does makes sense to a lot of people but has no scientific study behind it. I would love to try it on system we could make batches in one mash so we could have 3 different hopping methods going. I would love to do experiments like FWH with and with out dry hopping, along with regular kettle hopping with and without dry hopping. All done with the same wort side by side in the same fermentation closet pitched with the same yeast slurry.
I have heard some guys talk about cons in the method, but that was on one of the big forums, and I consider that forum's knowledge more driven to what corner they can cut and what apple pumpkin cheerio super IPA they can brew using s-05 at 80 degrees and will it taste good?
Besides that I here good things about it. Just nothing done in a definitive nature. I do not have the lab facilities to do scientific breakdown, I do have friends that tell the truth about my brewing.
So seeing how I have honest friends, and an enquirering mind, just maybe I can pass along some information that has merit.

My first Rye ale seems to have a nice balance and a bit smoother, but it is maybe me being to zealous.my new try is in the fermenter, a continental lager, a beer I have brewed a lot, I am going to be able to tell moor off this beer.

I am looking for a few small 2 gallon fermenters for further experiments.
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Re: Late Wort Hopping

Post by Mad_Scientist » 2 months ago

This is the link PistolPatch posted awhile back regarding FWH; http://brewery.org/library/1stwort.html


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Re: Late Wort Hopping

Post by Jamato » 1 month ago

well a blind tasting is in

I had 4 guys do the test, each had 4 beers in front of them, labeled a, b, c, d. they were actually just 2 beers, both a simple blonde ale, when the mash was finished the wort was separated into 2 pots. Now one was hopped right away and the other hopped when the boil started. no finishing hops were used.

2 of the guys were able to match the correct beers, of those 2 they stated that the one which was FWHed was smoother. they did not know what the difference was.
1 guy did match the best, but claimed that one beer had less hops as it was not as bitter, not smoother but less bitter, that was one of the FHWed beer
the forth guy thought it was all the same beer.

next beer is going be a Lager, and then a higher hopped style such as a ESB or a IPA.

I think with this test I have found this is a nuance thing, maybe with the masses could not be much of a difference, but with more educated palates will show results.
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