Cold conditioning

Post #1 made 2 years ago
Hi everyone,

up to now I primed, bottled and left the beer just sit at fermentation temperature (64°F/18°C) for about 2 weeks (no cold crash).
Having read about cold conditioning (i.e. putting the bottles into a fridge at around 32°F/0°C for 2-3 weeks), I wonder whether I should do that, too.
As this would take buying a second fridge for the beer only, I wonder whether this procedure (not to be confounded with cold crash) really makes that much of a difference in flavor as to justify the purchase.

Could anybody share his/her thoughts and maybe his/her experience with this?

Thanks
Last edited by bruwa on 05 Nov 2015, 03:29, edited 1 time in total.

Post #2 made 2 years ago
Bruwa, Once you Bottled the Beer it will not Change. You may Notice a layer of Yeast "Dregs" in the Bottom of the Bottles.

Also, you should "Cold Crash" the Beer in Bulk, and Siphon as little Yeast as Possible, as you Transfer the beer to you Bottling Equipment.

If you Can get a small amount of yeast from the Cold Crash, it will Help Carbonate, if your Going Natural.

Then, remember the Temperature of the beer, when you Calculated the Bottling Sugar.

Please see THughes poet at viewtopic.php?f=37&t=3448&p=50953#p50953
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Post #3 made 2 years ago
Cold conditioning for a couple weeks will likely only help to settle out chill haze and compact the yeast sediment a bit better. It's ideal, I suppose ... to store all beer (that isn't intended to be aged/cellared) in a fridge at some point. But, surely not worth the extra bucks in my opinion. I can't imagine the flavor would be impacted all that much, but if you have a ridiculously sensitive palate ... you could experiment with a few bottles and answer your own question.
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Post #4 made 2 years ago
I'm not sure where I took the idea from - most likely from these sources

https://www.morebeer.com/articles/conditioning see "The final act — the conditioning phase"

https://www.homebrewhedonist.com/cold-c ... -homebrew/
Quote: the flavours blend nicely together at this stage and the bitterness, although present, smoothens out to allow for a more sessionable taste to come out. As the beer matures in a cold environment, it allows the flavour compounds in the beer to stabilize and flavors mold together, while avoiding any staleness and oxidization that can occur in the natural ageing of beer.

Maybe there is some mixing up cold conditioning and lagering

Up to now I did (clear) Ales and (typically slightly hazy) Wheat - no cold crash, just bottle carbing and conditioning at 64°F/18°C

I might just test with a few bottles and see.

Thanks

Post #5 made 2 years ago
Lagering is used with lager yeast and is a type of fermentation. Cold crashing is preformed after fermentation to drop the yeast and solids out of suspension before packaging. Cold conditioning is done after packaging as a way to age the beer.
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Post #6 made 2 years ago
Lumpy5oh wrote:Lagering is used with lager yeast and is a type of fermentation. Cold crashing is preformed after fermentation to drop the yeast and solids out of suspension before packaging. Cold conditioning is done after packaging as a way to age the beer.
Cellaring beer is typically done at 50-55F range, 32-35F for a matter of weeks is what is specified here in this thread.
Last edited by Rick on 06 Nov 2015, 06:46, edited 1 time in total.
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