BIABacus scaling recipe question

For those who like to brew BIAB just using their stovetop.
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BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby mikeamo » 3 week ago

Hi all,
I'm doing a stovetop 10L brew of a popular recipe I found on Beersmith and just want some feedback to see if I have used the BIABacus to scale the recipe correctly. Here's a link to the Beersmith page:
http://beersmithrecipes.com/viewrecipe/1645/bells-two-hearted-ipa

And here's the BIABacus recipe:
BIABacus PR1.3T - Bells Two Hearted IPA - Batch A1.xls


Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Mike :thumbs:
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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby Scott » 3 week ago

Hi Mike,

It looks pretty good to me, provided your pot info is in there right. A couple minor things...

I try to be a bit more exact on things... So like their VAW at 6 gallons, I would use 22.7 liters to match up to 6 gallons (instead of rounding to 23 liters). But that's pretty minor.

The carmel malt, you didn't put in the color... If you don't know what you will use, could pull up a carmel malt and use the published EBC (color) for it and it should be close. Or call your LHBS and ask what they're using. Easy Google search and you have it.

Yeast attenuation, leaving at default of 75 is good. According to Wyeast's website it estimates 74-76%. https://www.wyeastlab.com/yeast-strain/ ... ite-50-ale. This is one thing that I've learned to check when setting up my BIABacus file. (And you may have...).

That's all I saw... From what I can see it looks good besides that.

EDIT: The recipe is for an American IPA (or American Indian Pale Ale), not American Pale Ale - otherwise known as APA... ;)  These are somewhat different beer styles. Noticed that in the verbiage on your file...but looked fine besides that.
Last edited by Scott on 31 Jan 2017, 12:22, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby mikeamo » 3 week ago

Hi Scott

Thanks heaps for your reply and valuable info.
I've adjusted the VAW to 22.7 and looking at the original recipe it states "Caramel/Crystal Malt - 20L (20.0 SRM)". I've done some google investigation and it looks like it will be a Light Crystal Malt, but yes I'll talk to my LHBS when buying the ingredients.

Ok thanks for that, am I right in thinking that IPAs are generally a hoppier beer than an APA?

Cheers
Mike

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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby Scott » 3 week ago

Hi Mike,

Okay then... They mean Carmel or Crystal. They are very similar malts. I believe Carmel is British and Crystal is American. And the 20 number for SRM and Lovibond will be approximately 40 on the EBC scale. (Lovibond and SRM are the same number or approximately the same number...).

And yeah IPA is bigger in OG and way hoppier than APA. Resulting ABV is normally in the 5-5.5% for APA and 6.5-7% for IPA. I live in America's Pacific Northwest. IPA has been all the rage for years. Personal opinion, IPA can be good if well balanced but APA is something I really like and prefer. IPA for me is frequently "over the top", in hoppiness (IBUs), and a bigger beer...meaning less sessionable. APA something I try to always have on tap in my home brewery... 

So yeah, this will come down to personal opinion and more beer drinkers in my area of the USA would disagree with me and prefer the "over the top" IPA to APA. Most of these will consider APA as the beer that got them to like "hoppy" beers and led them into IPA. Both normally rely on "C" hops with lots of bold citrus flavor like Cascade and Centennial for APA, and IPA them plus more...CTZ, Amarillo, etc. But the hopping level is quite different! APA is hoppy, and IPA super-hoppy!

Hope this helps.  :thumbs: 
Last edited by Scott on 31 Jan 2017, 22:00, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby mikeamo » 3 week ago

Hi Scott,

I think I prefer the APA's as well. I think they're a bit more balanced. I like the hop bitterness to sit back a little so you can get the citrus flavours coming through. A particular favourite of mine here in NZ is the Panhead APA, an awesome beer.
Anyway I'll try this IPA recipe and then I want to do a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale clone. Do you know of any other good recipes for APA's?
Cheers
Mike

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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby Scott » 3 week ago

I normally use the BCS (Brewing Classic Styles) book and the book's APA recipe. Jamil Z and John Palmer are both credited as authors, but my understanding is most of the recipes are Jamil's, and he did a great job on them! I've never had one that wasn't good. Supposedly all or most are "award winning". And very easy for us to scale to our BIABacus file.

The APA recipe, I think is based on Sierra Nevada Pale Ale (the original APA). Very easy to tweak it one way or the other... And with minor changes, can have some definite differences in beer. Minor hop changes, but also yeast changes. I grow Cascade hops on the west side of my house. It always gets used in my APA...sometimes 100% Cascade. One time a year, at harvest in late August here, I can make Fresh Hop Pale Ale (awesome!!!).

With Fresh Hop APA, Wyeast's NW Ale Yeast (Wyeast 1332) is awesome! Always everyone's favorite; very smooth. But normal day-to-day, I think I prefer Wyeast 1056 American Ale Yeast (same as WLP001, and US05). Hops come through stronger.. I've used WLP005 / Wyeast 1272 before and it seems like it finishes similar to but maltier than 1056 American Ale Yeast. Haven't used it for years... Just brewed another test of APA with1056 vs 1332. Been in kegs only 2 days. May have to do a 1056 vs 1272 next time...

Well thanks for the beer tip. Is that a New Zealand beer? Here in the US, occasionally have Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and also Deschutes Mirror Pond... (Fresh is much better than a few months old). I drink a lot more of my beer than others, but APA is a style I consume lots of. ;)
Last edited by Scott on 01 Feb 2017, 06:33, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby Mad_Scientist » 3 week ago

I made a double batch of my version of the Two Hearted Ale and am currently drinking it.  Beginning on post #50 of my "I Heart Me - IPA" recipe thread (starting at the last post on 2nd page) I have laid out my recipe and results.  It's a good beer.  I targeted a 1.063 OG.
MS

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Re: BIABacus scaling recipe question

Postby mikeamo » 3 week ago

Hi Scott, thanks for the info I'll have to get that book. This will only be my second BIAB so at this stage I don't really know much about yeasts and what flavour changes they can make. Maybe after a few more brews.
Thanks Mad_Scientist I'll check it out.

Cheers
Mike :clap:


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