First BIAB - Infected?

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Scott
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Post by Scott » 1 year ago

I love to look... Can't help myself. When beer is fermenting and I walk past my fermenter, just can't help but to pop off the air lock and see how it is looking and smelling inside. Granted the smell is usually much better with ales than it is with lagers (hold your nose, suffer, and the alcohol can about knock you out)... But the process tells me that progress is being made in turning it to beer, and that makes me happy. :party:

Good point though on different yeasts looking quite different, and try to calm yourself and just observe... Trust that your excellent sanitization regime is working and just observe great beer is being made. :!: :thumbs:

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ShorePoints
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Post by ShorePoints » 1 year ago

Joshua, I call BS on the degassing link. There are a number of ways to degas solutions (wine, beer, others). Pulling a vacuum on the headspace will work, to a point, but there comes a time when sucking the pressure from above the solution is the same as distilling at lower temperature. This goes on until the pressure limit of the glass carboy is exceeded - that would be a very powerful vacuum pump! Water jet aspirators will not get there. Lab people - think rotovap The distillation would be removing both alcohol and water (the water-ethanol azeotrope, partial pressures and all that) and aromatics with vapor pressures that contribute to the good and desirable smells. Remember also that gases are more soluble in aqueous solutions at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. If I degassed before bottling, how much priming sugar would be required? There's more that is misleading in that link, so please do not degas your beer - it is not wine.


joshua
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Post by joshua » 1 year ago

Shorepoints, Degassing the Wine, Beer, or Vinegar, is the What Companies do to speed up the Entire Process.

I never de-gas, as I secondary the Beer, for 2-3 weeks, until it is "Laser pointer" Clear, then Cold Crash the Secondary for 7-10 days for any Chill Haze issues.

Then transfer the Ice Cold Beer to the Bottling Bucket, and let it warm up to Room temperature, add the priming sugar Needed, and Bottle.

I have to let it sit for 2 week to fully Carbonate, due to the "Very Little" Yeast left in the Beer.

But, there is a Very thin Coat of Dead yeasty's left in the Bottle

So, 10 days in the Primary, 14-21 days in the Secondary, 10 days Crash Cooling, and 14 days until the Bottles Open.

I am in no Hurry.

FWIW JMHO.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.

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ShorePoints
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Post by ShorePoints » 1 year ago

joshua wrote:Shorepoints, Degassing the Wine, Beer, or Vinegar, is the What Companies do to speed up the Entire Process.

I never de-gas, as I secondary the Beer, for 2-3 weeks, until it is "Laser pointer" Clear, then Cold Crash the Secondary for 7-10 days for any Chill Haze issues.

Then transfer the Ice Cold Beer to the Bottling Bucket, and let it warm up to Room temperature, add the priming sugar Needed, and Bottle.

I have to let it sit for 2 week to fully Carbonate, due to the "Very Little" Yeast left in the Beer.

But, there is a Very thin Coat of Dead yeasty's left in the Bottle

So, 10 days in the Primary, 14-21 days in the Secondary, 10 days Crash Cooling, and 14 days until the Bottles Open.

I am in no Hurry. FWIW JMHO.
Joshua, your way sounds great. It addresses all that leads to clear(er) high quality beer and I will try to copy it in the future. As for what Companies do to speed up the Entire Process, their goal is different - Get that stuff out the door.... I have always found that waiting for beer is the hardest part. Once I built up an inventory, and that is only possible by brewing beer faster than it gets consumed, then waiting is not as difficult. After you have cold-crashed, transferred to the bottling bucket and warmed to room temp, what temperature do you use in calculating how much priming sugar to add? Room temp would seem to be correct? And the very thin coat of yeast left at the bottom of the bottle is/was needed to do the carbonation thing in the bottle until it is finished or the bottle gets opened. I prefer to open my bottles from the top, but I have had some open on their own.... :blush:
Last edited by ShorePoints on 29 Dec 2015, 04:19, edited 1 time in total.


joshua
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Post by joshua » 1 year ago

ShorePoints, I use 68F for the 2.0 Volumes needed for my Ales, then after 10 days the Bottles go to 50F-55F for Drinking.

The Carbonation is sometimes Low, around 1.5 Volumes, but Self opening Bottles have not Happened for 3 Years.

I do brew a 12 Pack/144oz/3L VIP, every week to 10 Days.

So records are a necessity!
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.

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