Green Apple Smell

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jrodie
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Green Apple Smell

Post by jrodie » 5 years ago

I brewed a Black IPA awhile back with US-05 that had a strong green apple smell appear after kegging it. After some research I found that the beer was "green" and should have been allowed to sit in the fermentor for a few more weeks. I had never experienced this before and was surprised it was an issue since it was one of my first times to use a fermentation fridge and keep the beer fermenting in the low 60s. I recently brewed a pale ale with white labs 001 that had the same smell just not quite as strong. Luckily I caught this one during a gravity reading and an now waiting for the yeast to clean up the green apple smell.

The main reason I bought a fermentation fridge was to reduce fusel alcohol flavors that were sometimes present in the stronger ales I brewed. I had never noticed this green apple smell before though. My question is if anyone knows of a temperature range that won't produce fusel alcohols or the green apple smell? Both problems seem to solve themselves with extra time in the fermentor, but if I can cut down the wait time of the ferment with temperature control that would be great.

Also I understand Wyeast 1056/ Whit labs 001/ and US-05 are all basically the same yeast but as anyone noticed more or less fusels or green apple smell with one brand over another?

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Post by BobBrews » 5 years ago

jrodie

I ass_u_me that you read this http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html Otherwise I just haven't had the problem with green apples. I do let my primary set at least 3 weeks?
Last edited by BobBrews on 09 Mar 2012, 04:59, edited 3 times in total.
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Post by hashie » 5 years ago

Hi jrodie, I can't answer your questions but can give some personal experience.

I don't use a fermenting fridge, but I do use a cellar type room for fermenting that does have stable temperatures. I prefer my brews to ferment at the lower end of normal fermenting temperatures, generally between 12 and 16°c for Ales. I have found the lower the temperature, the longer the yeast needs to do it's work, 2 to 3 weeks in most cases.
I've got to say that having a low ferment temperature over a prolonged period makes for a very smooth beer. So if you can come to grips with it, you will reap the rewards.

Cheers
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Post by jrodie » 5 years ago

Yeah I'm sure you guys are right. Just need to be patient. Anyone had any issues with letting the beer sit for too long on the yeast?


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Post by stux » 5 years ago

I've been blessed with a green apple smell when I've underaerated
Fermenting: -
Cubed: -
Stirplate: -
On Tap: NS Summer Ale III (WY1272), Landlord III (WY1469), Fighter's 70/- II (WY1272), Roast Porter (WY1028), Cider, Soda
Next: Munich Helles III

5/7/12

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Post by BobBrews » 5 years ago

jrodie wrote:Yeah I'm sure you guys are right. Just need to be patient. Anyone had any issues with letting the beer sit for too long on the yeast?

No, It's a common myth that you have to get the beer off the primary yeast into a secondary. A secondary is not needed most of the time. It only introduces another chance for infection to start. Recent studies through BYO magazine and Basic Brewing Radio has shown the most people enjoy or like the beer more after an extended time in the primary. Four weeks or more is not unusual.

I know that the common sense answer is that the bottom of the primary is "Yucky" looking so it will make the beer yucky because it's touching it! Bullshit! Those lovely critters (yeast) died for you producing alcohol for you to kill your brain. The least you could do is honor them by letting them rest in peace.
Last edited by BobBrews on 09 Mar 2012, 20:34, edited 3 times in total.
tap 1 Raspberry wine
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tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

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Post by thughes » 5 years ago

Agreed with BB. I just bottled a Brett beer (Wyeast ESB and Brett B pitched together) that sat in primary for almost 6 months. Yummy stuff!
WWBBD?


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Post by jrodie » 5 years ago

Six months? I'd say that's a good test, thanks for the help guys :salute:


One more question, does anyone think that there is a benefit to making a starter over just using multiple smack packs?

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Post by thughes » 5 years ago

Re: Starter question:

If you reserve a bit of wort from your brew session and use it to make the starter, I would say that the benefit is strictly financial.
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Post by BobBrews » 5 years ago

thughes wrote:Re: Starter question:

If you reserve a bit of wort from your brew session and use it to make the starter, I would say that the benefit is strictly financial.
+1 thughes

If you have a favorite yeast that seems to treat you right than just reuse the yeast cake. I have pitched two bags of yeast for a lager and it came out fine. I reused that lager yeast three times or so and I came out ahead financially. Numerous healthy yeast make good beer. Weak and to few yeast struggle and make bad beer. You can pay for double yeast amounts and still come out ahead.
Last edited by BobBrews on 09 Mar 2012, 23:09, edited 3 times in total.
tap 1 Raspberry wine
tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

Pipeline: Mulled Cider 10% ABV

http://cheesestradamus.com/ Brewers challenge!

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