Carbonation of Kegs - What do you do?

Assumes carbonation of flat beer is done using a forced or gradual injection of CO2.
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Carbonation of Kegs - What do you do?

Post by Pat » 1 year ago

We've had several threads over the years on carbonation. One thing those threads have shown is that there is a massive variance in recommendations and techniques*.

We've nailed tricky stuff like this before so we might as well do it again.

Can you please click on the link below that applies to you or that you have experience in, and then follow the instructions there to give us your "numbers" on what works or has not worked for you?
If you keg and force carbonate (fast or slow)

If you keg and naturally carbonate

If you bottle * This thread is probably the best for showing the extent of the variations we get just on bottling.

** Use the file below to help you determine the correct carbonation level for your beer style. (We received kind permission from the AABC to use the numbers from the attached sheet several years ago.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by Pat on 20 Apr 2016, 20:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Pat » 1 year ago

If you force carbonate your kegs, please select and copy the Code below, paste it into the Quick Reply box and complete the details. Two examples (fast and slow) follow the code.

Code: Select all

[center][b]Keg - Force Carbonated[/b][/center]
[b]Overview[/b]

Beer Style:
Original Gravity:
Final Gravity:
Desired Vols CO2:
Metric or US Measurements Supplied:

[b]Yeast/s, Times and Temperatures[/b]

Main Yeast:
Type and Amount of Yeast Used when Priming (if any):
Wort Temp 72 hours before Priming:
Wort Temp at Priming:
Days Allowed for Carbonation:
Avg Temp during Carbonation Period:

[b]Volumes[/b]

Volume in Fermenter at Pitching:
Volume into Secondary (if used):
Volume into Keg:

[b]Priming Information[/b]

Process Used:

[b]Results[/b]

On a scale from 0 to 10, if 5 meant the beer was perfectly carbonated for the style and 0 meant the beer was completely flat and 10 meant the beer gushed or exploded, how would you rate the carbonation of this beer?:

[b]Notes and Personal Preferences[/b]

Notes:
Personal Preferences:
FAKE EXAMPLE Keg - Fast Force Carbonated Overview

Beer Style: American IPA
Original Gravity: 1.065
Final Gravity: 1.015
Desired Vols CO2: 2.5
Metric or US Measurements Supplied: Both

Yeast/s, Times and Temperatures

Main Yeast: US-05
Type and Amount of Yeast Used when Priming (if any):
Wort Temp 72 hours before Carbonating: 18 C (64.4F)
Wort Temp at Transfer to Keg: 6 C (42.8F)
Days Allowed for Carbonation: 3
Avg Temp during Carbonation Period: 6.0 C (42.8 F)

Volumes

Volume in Fermenter at Pitching: Can't remember
Volume into Secondary (if used): Not used
Volume into Keg: 18.7 L

Priming Information

Process Used: You have to be careful on this as things can back-fire on you and I don't want anyone to follow my numbers as I'm not sure on my conversions etc. Say if I will be dispensing at 110 kpa (16 psi), I basically set my regulator to a high pressure (400 kpa / 58 psi) as my kegs can handle that. I then lay my keg horizontally and rock it, listening to the regulator and lowering it gradually. If you lower it too fast, beer will flow back into your regulator and cause all sorts of problems. Once I get down to 110 kpa (16 psi), I keep rocking until I hear no sound. Then I put it in my dispensing fridge and generally leave it for three days.

Results

On a scale from 0 to 10, if 5 meant the beer was perfectly carbonated for the style and 0 meant the beer was completely flat and 10 meant the beer gushed or exploded, how would you rate the carbonation of this beer?: 5

Notes and Personal Preferences

Notes: Be careful when fast force-carbonating. It's easy to make significant errors.
Personal Preferences: I probably prefer moderate carbonation in my beers. I'm not a fan of flat beers or real fizzers.
FAKE EXAMPLE Keg - Slow Force Carbonated Overview

Beer Style: American IPA
Original Gravity: 1.065
Final Gravity: 1.015
Desired Vols CO2: 2.5
Metric or US Measurements Supplied: Both

Yeast/s, Times and Temperatures

Main Yeast: US-05
Type and Amount of Yeast Used when Priming (if any):
Wort Temp 72 hours before Carbonating: 18 C (64.4F)
Wort Temp at Transfer to Keg: 6 C (42.8F)
Days Allowed for Carbonation: 8
Avg Temp during Carbonation Period: 6.0 C (42.8 F)

Volumes

Volume in Fermenter at Pitching: Can't remember
Volume into Secondary (if used): Not used
Volume into Keg: 18.7 L

Priming Information

Process Used: Say if I will be dispensing at 110 kpa (16 psi), I put my keg in my dispensing fridge and just set my regulator to that pressure. I've tried force-carbonating before but find this method, while slower, far less problematic.

Results

On a scale from 0 to 10, if 5 meant the beer was perfectly carbonated for the style and 0 meant the beer was completely flat and 10 meant the beer gushed or exploded, how would you rate the carbonation of this beer?: 5

Notes and Personal Preferences

Notes:
Personal Preferences: I probably prefer moderate carbonation in my beers. I'm not a fan of flat beers or real fizzers.
Last edited by Pat on 20 Apr 2016, 20:42, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Pat » 1 year ago

If you naturally prime your kegs, please select and copy the Code below, paste it into the Quick Reply box and complete the details. An example follows the code.

Code: Select all

[center][b]Keg - Naturally Primed[/b][/center]
[b]Overview[/b]

Beer Style:
Original Gravity:
Final Gravity:
Desired Vols CO2:
Metric or US Measurements Supplied:

[b]Yeast/s, Times and Temperatures[/b]

Main Yeast:
Type and Amount of Yeast Used when Priming (if any):
Wort Temp 72 hours before Priming:
Wort Temp at Priming:
Days Allowed for Carbonation:
Avg Temp during Carbonation Period:

[b]Volumes[/b]

Volume in Fermenter at Pitching:
Volume into Secondary (if used):
Volume into Keg:

[b]Priming Information[/b]

Weight of Priming Sugar Used:
Type of Priming Sugar Used:
Process Used:

[b]Results[/b]

On a scale from 0 to 10, if 5 meant the beer was perfectly carbonated for the style and 0 meant the beer was completely flat and 10 meant the beer gushed or exploded, how would you rate the carbonation of this beer?:

Can you describe the humidity (cold and hot climates can both be humid or dry) in your area? In other words, do you think your priming sugar is really dry, can it get a little damp or something in between?:

[b]Notes and Personal Preferences[/b]

Notes:
Personal Preferences:
FAKE EXAMPLE Keg - Naturally Primed Overview

Beer Style: English Bitter
Original Gravity: 1.039
Final Gravity: 1.010
Desired Vols CO2: 2.0
Metric or US Measurements Supplied: Both

Yeast/s, Times and Temperatures

Main Yeast: US-05
Type and Amount of Yeast Used when Priming (if any):
Wort Temp 72 hours before Priming: 18 C (64.4F)
Wort Temp at Priming: 18 C (64.4F)
Days Allowed for Carbonation: 14
Avg Temp during Carbonation Period: 18C (64.4F)

Volumes

Volume in Fermenter at Pitching: 21.1 L
Volume into Secondary or Bottling Bucket (if used): Not used
Volume into Keg: 18.3 L

Priming Information

Weight of Priming Sugar Used: 76 grams (4.1 oz)
Type of Priming Sugar Used: Sucrose (white table sugar)
Process Used: Just added the sugar to the keg after transferring.

Results

On a scale from 0 to 10, if 5 meant the beer was perfectly carbonated for the style and 0 meant the beer was completely flat and 10 meant the beer gushed or exploded, how would you rate the carbonation of this beer?: 5

Can you describe the humidity (cold and hot climates can both be humid or dry) in your area? In other words, do you think your priming sugar is really dry, can it get a little damp or something in between?: A lot of the time of year, it is really hot and humid here. I keep my main lot of sugar in an air-tight container but, in my everyday container, it often clumps. I always prime using sugar from my air-tight container though.

Notes and Personal Preferences

Notes:
Personal Preferences: I probably prefer lower carbonation in my beers. For example, I brew more English styles than lagers or pale ales.
Last edited by Pat on 20 Apr 2016, 20:43, edited 1 time in total.
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