Adding extra yeast after lagering?

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Clackers
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Adding extra yeast after lagering?

Post by Clackers » 3 months ago

Hi guys,

I`ve been very quiet over the summer, no time with a couple of 7 year olds on holiday.
Anyway my small fridge has been busy with a lager for most of the summer, what a mistake. I ran out of
beer. I`ll keep lager for winter from now on so I can turn out ale regularly.

Anyway just a quick question. I have 10l of expat lager (BCS) needing to be packaged. Anyway while searching the net for how long to lager
for I found somewhere that suggest to add extra yeast with the priming sugar to ensure proper carbonation? I would have thought the yeast,
I used packet yeast would not dissolve and so not be distributed evenly.. any thoughts? I guess this suggestion is for liquid yeast, yeah?

One more question.
Being a lager and fermented at low temps. then lagered even lower. After packaging should the bottles be carbonated at the same temp as when it was fermented? I mean it is a lager yeast? or is the amount of yeast activity too low to produce any off flavors?

Fermented for 3 something weeks, this Friday will be for weeks lagering. So planning to bottle soon.

Cheers.


PistolPatch
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Re: Adding extra yeast after lagering?

Post by PistolPatch » 3 months ago

Hi Clackers,

Sounds like a great summer :peace:

Priming

I would not use extra yeast for priming. At time of writing, anyone who says they know exactly how to prime any style of bottled beer is doing way better than we are and, here, we have explored the issue. I know local craft breweries here (big ones) who have battled with bottle priming of some styles.

Just keep it simple. Focus on priming sugar quantities first. I'd prefer to see you prime bottles individually rather than bulk prime. This gives you the opportunity to vary the amount of priming sugar. For example, if priming 24 bottles, you could prime 8 with a certain amount, another 8 with a bit less and another 8 with a bit more.

The key here will be keeping records and passing them on to us as we still haven't cracked this area.

Lagering

This is yet another area of homebrewing that is full of contradictory information. When I worked for one of the original craft breweries back in the mid 1980's, all lagering was done in the kegs and bottles. They were left in large coolrooms for several months.

So, it was a surprise for me to hear, on forums etc, of lagering in a primary or seconday fermenter. I certainly don't think lagering (which is derived from the word, "longer") should be done in primary. I'm half-okay with a bit of it being done in secondary but only if the secondary is sealed.

I should research this more but what I do with lagers is pitch a few degrees low (say 9°C) and then let it naturally rise to 11°C and keep it there for 7 days. After 7 days, I'll let it wander a tad up to say 14°C although, from what I gather, if you pitch at a lower temp, a diacetyl rest is not needed. I'll then wander it back down to about 9°C. After 14 days, I wind it down to 0°C over three days. I then let it sit at that temp for 4 days and then I keg it.

I then taste the beer over time and see if I notice changes.

But, You're Bottling

The way I would approach a lager if bottling would be as follows...

1. As above on fermentation temperature regime.
2. After 12 days, do a slow, "closed" transfer to a secondary fermenter.
3. Let that secondary settle for four days undisturbed and then bottle.
4. Leave the bottles for ten days at 15°C or so and then put them in the fridge.

What I Don't Know

Personally I think there is a lot we don't know in this area. For example, one of the best lagers I tasted came from a batch I brewed. I kegged it in QLD (an East Australian state). It was certainly an okay brew however, I then moved states. The next time I tasted that keg was 6 or 7 weeks later after which time it had sat in a hot van (50-55°C) and traveled probably 6,000 kms. It was very good!

I remember reading about 12-15 years ago of some Australian invention where the ageing (lagering/cellaring) normally needed by red wine was reduced from years to months by simply raising the red wine to high temperatures.

So, I think we have a lot to learn in this area.

Is that enough to get you going confidently Clackers?

:peace:
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 08 Sep 2017, 23:33, edited 1 time in total.
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Topic author
Clackers
Draft
Draft
Japan
Posts: 31
Joined: 8 months ago
Location: Japan
Region: Asia
Preferred Brewing Method: Undecided
City: Tottori

Re: Adding extra yeast after lagering?

Post by Clackers » 2 months ago

Thanks for the reply PP. As usual lots to take in and try. In the end I just bulk primed as usual.
Time limited at the moment. Kids back at school and the wife has the renovation whip out. plus an eagerness to get my next ale in.
But I will try the things you said this winter when conditions are more suited to lager. Winter is coming.
That's seems so strange to say after GOT. I will be able to brew a lot more from now until spring, with my winter temps coming down to between
0 and 2C. I wont need my little fridge to control temps.
Thanks again for your reply and will definitely try your suggestions.


Inconceivable
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City: Burwood, Sydney

Re: Adding extra yeast after lagering?

Post by Inconceivable » 2 months ago

Clackers wrote:
3 months ago
Hi guys,

I`ve been very quiet over the summer, no time with a couple of 7 year olds on holiday.
Anyway my small fridge has been busy with a lager for most of the summer, what a mistake. I ran out of
beer. I`ll keep lager for winter from now on so I can turn out ale regularly.

Anyway just a quick question. I have 10l of expat lager (BCS) needing to be packaged. Anyway while searching the net for how long to lager
for I found somewhere that suggest to add extra yeast with the priming sugar to ensure proper carbonation? I would have thought the yeast,
I used packet yeast would not dissolve and so not be distributed evenly.. any thoughts? I guess this suggestion is for liquid yeast, yeah?

One more question.
Being a lager and fermented at low temps. then lagered even lower. After packaging should the bottles be carbonated at the same temp as when it was fermented? I mean it is a lager yeast? or is the amount of yeast activity too low to produce any off flavors?

Fermented for 3 something weeks, this Friday will be for weeks lagering. So planning to bottle soon.

Cheers.
Hey Clackers just noticed this and wanted to say two things:

1) I made the BCS Expat - A Dortumunder EXport style beer and it was delicious, easily the best lager I've made, everyone loved it too. I accidentally jacked up the water chemicals to 1.5x what I was planning due to a scale malfunction but all was fine. I hope you enjoy it as much as me, it's on my short list to rebrew
2) If you don't like waiting for lagers check out the fast lagering method at Brulosopher, a lot of people have reported success with this method including me http://brulosophy.com/methods/lager-method/

cheers
Nick

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