Hop addition Exbeeriment

Post #1 made 1 year ago
Hello all

Has anyone read http://brulosophy.com/2016/05/02/hop-st ... t-results/

I have transitioned to a small bittering charge at 60 minutes and a large hop addition at flameout with a generous dry hop.

Now this article indicates there is not much difference and IBU calculations ay not be worth as much as we think.

Thoughts?
Last edited by Primavera on 05 May 2016, 07:15, edited 1 time in total.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 20 Brews From United States of America

Post #3 made 1 year ago
Hi Mad_Scientist,

What temperature do you run your hop stand at? I.e. do you cool the wort down a bit before the hop stand addition?

Thanks

Post #4 made 1 year ago
I wait a couple of minutes after flame-out just to record my VFO. I am electric and no chill, so I recirculate and will keep it from falling below 190 °F by way of PID. No chill, I like to drain into container no lower than 190 °F. It's all one big exbeeriment :lol: for me. YMMV

Rick uses gas, so I would guess he does NOT add any more heat after flame-out. :dunno:
Brewing with MS; https://goo.gl/photos/puZUgG8QRp7p8gLd9
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Hop addition Exbeeriment

Post #5 made 1 year ago
I have done hop stands for 30 minutes after the temperature has dropped to 85C and I no chill. As long as the wort is over 75C for 15 minutes after packing it will effectively pasteurize it and if it is cleaned and sanitized that is really just an extra precaution.

Calculating late additions in terms of IBUs is fraught with danger. There really is no clear understanding of what actually happens so it really comes down to personal taste.

I have made 3 different beers from one wort by only cube hopping 3 separate cubes with not bittering addition at all and they turned out great.

Try different things, see what you like, do more of that. Rinse and repeat!

Post #6 made 1 year ago
Side by side experiments are always the best. Of course, you need to repeat them on different styles and, often, on the same style, to draw conclusions. (We did a similiar experiment here, about five years ago, on an IPA and also got the same sort of results.)

I would have liked to have seen Tinseth IBU estimates rather than Rager as Tinseth has been shown to be better on all-grain brews.
Contrarian wrote:Calculating late additions in terms of IBUs is fraught with danger. There really is no clear understanding of what actually happens so it really comes down to personal taste.
This is a good summary of what we've talked about here for over six years now. (This post and the first link in it are relevant here.)

There is a massive focus on IBU's by homebrewers at the expense of flavour and aroma. First wort hopping adds bitterness and flavour. Late boil or post-boil additions are about adding flavour and aroma however, you rarely hear this discussed. So, what to do?

...

Firstly, find recipes you can trust when starting out.

Secondly, it took a very long time to get Section G in the BIABacus so concise. Make sure you use that; no other software asks for chilling or hop management information despite it being really important.

Thirdly, a different version of what Contrarian said above - when tasting your beer, see what you like. If there is something you don't like hop-wise, is it an imbalance in bitterness, flavour or aroma? Analysing numbers has its place but only up to a certain point. At some point, especially when working on flavour and aroma, you'll have to get away from the numbers and ask questions or experiment.

Focussing on IBU's is a bit like focussing on colour in malts. Two completely different grain bills can result in exactly the same colour but completely different beers.

:peace:
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 05 May 2016, 19:43, edited 1 time in total.
If you have found the above or anything else of value on BIABrewer.info, consider supporting us by getting some BIPs!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From Australia

Post #7 made 1 year ago
Mad_Scientist wrote:I wait a couple of minutes after flame-out just to record my VFO. I am electric and no chill, so I recirculate and will keep it from falling below 190 °F by way of PID. No chill, I like to drain into container no lower than 190 °F. It's all one big exbeeriment :lol: for me. YMMV

Rick uses gas, so I would guess he does NOT add any more heat after flame-out. :dunno:

I used to flame on to bump the temperature up, but I don't bother anymore. Now that I do larger batches with other heated kettles nearby ... the temp losses tend to be pretty minimal. It's usually around 190F after 30m, maybe a few degrees less.
Last edited by Rick on 05 May 2016, 19:46, edited 1 time in total.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 20 Brews From United States of America
Post Reply

Return to “Hopping”

Brewers Online

Brewers browsing this forum: No members and 1 guest

cron