Big Mistake - first batch I've ever dumped from fermenter.

Post #1 made 1 year ago
This is in the intermediate forum because beginners would never have this problem.

The Background

Brewed a very simple recipe a few weeks ago, very few malts and only one hop spread over two additions. On transfer from primary to secondary, had a taste and pretty puckering. It was an ale so in secondary, I ramped up the temp but tasted today and, it is going to be ditched.

What Went Wrong?

Definitely one thing, possibly two...

Yeast: The yeast I used was a dried one, just bought, but, I had an old sachet of the same yeast that had been sitting in my fridge for ages so, my thinking was, "This is a bit large=r than normal batch, might as well throw in half a sachet of the old yeast. What harm could it do?"

My thinking was that it would be dead, and, even if it was, it would just act as yeast nutrient.

So, I poured it in and then I smelled the sachet. It was not a good smell. I'd never heard of dried yeast, in the sachet, becoming infected so, yet another information first for this site - send money :P.

Hops: This beer was brewed with another member here, youmustbemellow. This beer involved a first wort hop addition and we decided, to emulate first wort hopping better to grab a few litres of sweet liquor, add it to a small saucepan containing the first wort hops and very gradually bring it to the boil on the stove-top.

Both of us said, "It smells like a tasted cheese sandwich!" I never use the hop we were using and it is known to be a bit odd but, in hindsight, this cheesiness could have been due to age. (I had expected any cheesy hops, something I had only read about, to be also dis-coloured. In other words, I expected them to be yellow, yellow-brown, certainly not green as ours were.)

The Lesson

I have no idea how many beers I have brewed but that is the first all-grain one I have ever ditched before packaging. All equipment used in the process was brand-new as well.

I think the main lesson to be learned here is, to smell everything first. You smell your milk and whatever else before you use it; the same should go for your brewing. If I had smelled that dried yeast sachet before throwing it in, how many hours and dollars would I have saved?

As for the 'cheesy hops,' I personally don't think they ruined the brew (cheesy hops are used in some styles) but, if I hadn't added the half sachet of dodgy yeast, at least youmustbemellow and I would have learned something about cheesy hops.

Oh, and the second lesson is to label and date every malt, hop, yeast you buy/store. I could write heaps more on that but need to do two brews tomorrow to make up for the one going down the drain.

:smoke:
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 08 Jun 2016, 23:37, edited 1 time in total.
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Post #2 made 1 year ago
My condolences. And thanks for the heads up on using remains of a left-over sachet. I'm tossing the one in my fridge today. Taste or sniff everything before it goes in (except maybe don't taste the hop pellets).

Labels can be the bane of storing stuff. Make up your own system for batch history dates, and lot numbers, then stick to it. There is not (to my knowledge) a standardized system for variable ingredients in a process like brewing. We know that hops vary in AA% from batch to batch, year to year, grains are different as time passes and sources change. My well water pH drifts seasonally.
A big pharma company wasted ungodly amounts of time trying to standardize labelling around the world and then did nothing because it was not feasible. They, as are we, are making a product that is different from widgets. The product has to fit in a range of acceptibility, but it must have some wiggle room since it comes from materials that also vary.

Post #4 made 1 year ago
PP, the yeast packet failed and let Oxygen, and a Bit of Moisture into the yeast.

The yeast did it's thing Slowly, and Decomposed.

I have "Yeast Nutrient", that smells Cheesy.

That is what Dead Yeast smell like.

You CAN add that Cheesy Yeast to the Last 10-15 minutes of the Boil, to sterilize it into Yeast Nutrient.

JMHO.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
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Post #6 made 1 year ago
BDP, any left over yeast, can be killed and sterilized in the last 15 minutes of the Boil, and will be New Yeast Nutrient.
Image
The Bacteria from Sour Beer/Sour Dough, will also be Sterilized in the Boil.
Image
Yeast has no trouble being Cannibals.
Last edited by joshua on 09 Jun 2016, 22:33, edited 1 time in total.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
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Post #7 made 1 year ago
Josh is totally correct on boiling dead yeast as a nutrient. I don't know what was going through my brain that day in adding old yeast straight to the fermenter :scratch:.

Still have some other sachets that are old so am going to open them with a friend and give them the nostril test and compare notes.

Good notes from ShorePoints as always. I can't believe that I have been brewing for so long and still am lazy at labelling the date on ingredients. I have now stuck permanent markers where I can easily get to them.

Talk about a slow learner!
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Re:

Post #8 made 10 months ago
PistolPatch wrote:
1 year ago
I have now stuck permanent markers where I can easily get to them.
I started doing that too, but then mistakenly used permanent on my whiteboard I use for my brew days.
They are now strictly separated. :idiot:
Stout, Stout, Stout, and some other stuff...
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