stout, fermenting, and secondary

Post #1 made 3 years ago
My 4th biab, an oatmeal stout, is at day 8 of fermentation, and now I'm wondering what to do next. Thanks for your suggestions!

I don't want to use finings for this beer as I'm not too concerned with clarity. So now what to do after fermentation.. The internet is all over the place from leaving the stout in the primary for up to four weeks for taste and mellowing, some people leave it in the primary for one extra week (post fermentation) for "yeast die off"?, and then some folks might go right to bottling after fermentation is complete. And personally, I'm wondering what racking to a secondary would accomplish without finings? Am I going to have more sediment in the bottle? Would I remove any natural sediment in a secondary without finings? Would a week in a secondary contribute anything that couldn't be done with an extra week in the primary?

Or more in a broad sense, what variables should I be considering when determining what my next step should be?

Thanks!
Jeff

Post #2 made 3 years ago
VonBobo,
Stout takes longer to Ferment as well as clear, if you leave it on the yeast cake from more than 21 days the dead yeast can Breakdown and give bad off flavors.

If you brew often, transfer the Stout to a secondary, a few days after the yeast falls, or about 1.020SG.

Keep it under a airlock, and you can wait until it looks clearer(up to a month).

If the temperature can be held near 23C/72F, the Stout should get Darker(clearer) On it's ownn in less than 8 weeks.

Also, Bulk aging is MUCH better than Bottle Conditioning(IMHO).

Stout is much better tasting at 3 months than 6 weeks.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Post #3 made 3 years ago
joshua wrote:VonBobo,
Stout takes longer to Ferment as well as clear, if you leave it on the yeast cake from more than 21 days the dead yeast can Breakdown and give bad off flavors.

If you brew often, transfer the Stout to a secondary, a few days after the yeast falls, or about 1.020SG.

Keep it under a airlock, and you can wait until it looks clearer(up to a month).

If the temperature can be held near 23C/72F, the Stout should get Darker(clearer) On it's ownn in less than 8 weeks.

Also, Bulk aging is MUCH better than Bottle Conditioning(IMHO).

Stout is much better tasting at 3 months than 6 weeks.
Great tips, thanks for your suggestions. I need to ask a couple of questions just to make sure I understand what is really happening.

"if you brew often"- is this so I have my primary ready to go for a new batch, but still leaving the stout on the yeast long enough to ferment?

To clarify and age, you mentioned secondary and air lock for up to a month, but next you mentioned 8 weeks. So the total time to clarify in secondary should be 4-8 weeks? Should I bottle it after the clarifying takes place, or can I continue to bulk age for three months? (not that I have the patience to wait, but just trying to figure out the reasoning.)

Thanks again!
Jeff
Last edited by vonBobo on 09 Mar 2015, 04:31, edited 1 time in total.

Post #4 made 3 years ago
VonBobo, you could Transfer the Stout to secondary at 12 days to 21 days without worrying about the Dead Yeast.

In the Secondary there is No Air to allow the yeast/Stout to Oxidize, since the Primary has air introduced to it a few times.

Depending on Temperature, Cool temps, can take Longer for the Yeast to finish.

If it is keep near 72F, 2 weeks in Primary, then 4-6 weeks in a secondary, it should be ready to Bottle.

You can Wait for 6 more weeks and Bottle Nearly Clear Stout.

Then start to Consume, after 2 weeks of conditioning.

I use a Narrow Beam Flashlight to check the clarification, since the Stout Is very Dark.

If the light can be seen on the Far side, it is ready to bottle.

Stout is very Forgiving on how long it ages.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Post #6 made 3 years ago
VonBobo, in My Part of America, Fizzy Yellow Hop Soda is the Standard.

I brew Brown ales, Porters, and Stouts.

Amber Ale is Good, But, I Find The Hops get in the Way.

JMHO...Pale Ales and Lagers are Standard, for Most people.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America
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