Post #2 made 6 years ago
Honey is a pretty different kettle of fish than sugar with respect to fermentation. In essence, honey is a combination of glucose and fructose, both of which are simple sugars, but the yeasties don't quite see it that way. Yeast (as far as I know!) will happily munch through glucose like it's nobodies business, but the fructose can take a lot longer for it to breakdown. So while I imagine you could use honey, it would probably take a lot longer for the residual sweetness to go away. That being said, it'd probably take longer to carb as well???

I'm certainly no expert on this, and just know what I know from reading about and having made 1 batch of braggot. I vote, next time you're bottling, do most with sugar, and then maybe 3 or 4 bottles with honey, then try them in stages. I'm a bit curious now ;)
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Post #3 made 6 years ago
aussiebeerslave,

If I remember correctly (Bee Poop) is devoid of any nutrients. It may work but if the yeast doesn't have much to work with it may not carbonate very well and leave some honey behind. Try looking at this!

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/bottlin ... on-130978/

Try Google(ing) with carbonating with honey

It comes up with lots of help!
Last edited by BobBrews on 01 Jun 2011, 21:49, edited 5 times in total.
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tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

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Post #4 made 6 years ago
Cheers fullas,

I'm checked out those threads and did that search Bob, very helpful, thanks. The anti-honey mob is quite vocal, buggar them! :shoot:

From what i can gather a good ratio is about 2 cups per 25lt (roughly) was thinking i'll disolve it first and then mix it into the bottling bucket (which im gunna have to find somewhere) to ensure even dossage.

One question i have though is that when i'm stirring it into the bottling bucket how careful do i have to be about not over-airating.

Aussiebeerslave.

Post #5 made 6 years ago
Aussiebeerslave,

Sanitize a soup ladle and move it up and down. Pulling it up and stopping just below the surface will keep the oxygenation to a minimum. Repeating the motion will mix the honey sufficiently. In all reality the oxygenation we do bottling (kegging) is not enough to ruin a beer. I think the books overdo it. It doesn't hurt to be careful but I don't fret over it. I am kegging a Amarillo Ale this morning. I substituted a hop new to me called Citra! The beer will be called "Citra Ass Down"!
tap 1 Raspberry wine
tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

Pipeline: Mulled Cider 10% ABV

http://cheesestradamus.com/ Brewers challenge!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Post #7 made 6 years ago
I am kegging a Amarillo Ale this morning. I substituted a hop new to me called Citra! The beer will be called "Citra Ass Down"!
All.
I have since tried the "All Citra" ale. It turned out great. The Citra hops was reminiscent of Amarillo or Cascade but enough difference to make it unique. I also added all the timed hops (10 min. 5 min. flameout) to the primary after fermentation. I used a secondary this time and dry hopped there too! A hop bomb for sure! At the very least I know now what Citra can be used for or (misused) for!

Citra™ has fairly high alpha acids and total oil contents with a low percentage of cohumulone content. The variety imparts interesting citrus and tropical fruit characters to beer.
Last edited by BobBrews on 06 Jul 2011, 21:05, edited 5 times in total.
tap 1 Raspberry wine
tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

Pipeline: Mulled Cider 10% ABV

http://cheesestradamus.com/ Brewers challenge!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America
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