Souring

Post #1 made 9 years ago
I've had this question in the back of my mind for a while now. I often partigyle my spent grains after a brew by adding in another pound of fresh grains and some hot water. I then mash 24-48 hours with my bag in a cooler to get a soured mash and brew a light beer where I add different things such as coriander, grapefruit peels, grains of paradise, etc. The plus is I can use all the same equipment since the souring is pre-boil so the bugs get killed off in the brew pot.

I've always wanted to do a gose but just haven't had a second set of soft equipment to use on it and I'd rather not risk using my regular equipment for fear of infection in my other beers. The question is, how different is souring pre-boil from souring post-boil?

For example, could you take this recipe and sour mash it preboil and get the same taste or close to the taste you'd get if you fermented it with a lacto and yeast combination? http://www.themadfermentationist.com/20 ... ecipe.html My sours at 48 hours and 10-15 IBU and 1020's OG raised to just under 1030 with sugar additions come out pretty sour. A very lemony sour, not puckering, but just about. So would say 3 or 4 days and the higher gravity and IBUs get me there?
Blog: http://littlehouseonthesandpit.wordpress.com/
Facebook BIAB Group: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=7 ... 978&ref=nf

Post #2 made 9 years ago
I think I know just the bloke to help you out with this question 2xC. (I wouldn't have a clue myself :)). I'll get in touch with him and then get back to you. He's a great bloke, brews excellent beer and knows everything about beer. I'm sure he will be willing to help you out.

Will PM you when I hear from him ;).
If you have found the above or anything else of value on BIABrewer.info, consider supporting us by getting some BIPs!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From Australia

Post #4 made 9 years ago
Okay, Brendanos is the brewer I was referring to and as usual he replied straight away and with, what I assume is, a great answer. (I wouldn't know - this stuff is way out of my league!)

Brendanos judges beers and, if my memory serves me correctly, has scored a bag full of medals (golds too) and often in this sort of category - whatever you call it :scratch:

Here is his answer...
They're both great options.

I haven't sour mashed but have tasted beers that were and they can be amazing. I take it your looking to avoid contaminating fermenters/hoses etc? You should make sure your spent grain isn't too hot (50-55Cmax) when you add the fresh/cap malt because you might kill the Lactobacillus. Insulate it as best you can and try to keep air out of/away from the mash (esky+camping mat or similar would be perfect) to discourage nasty aerobic thermophillic bacteria.

I love the process (partigyle ftw) - will have to give it a go next time I brew! I'll swap some of your sour mashed beers for some fermented with cultured bugs &/or doctored with food grade lactic acid if you'd like to contrast different souring techniques :)
Last edited by PistolPatch on 22 Oct 2010, 18:25, edited 5 times in total.
If you have found the above or anything else of value on BIABrewer.info, consider supporting us by getting some BIPs!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From Australia

Post #5 made 9 years ago
The easiest way to have a good sour beer is to use the method that I used last year. First, I brewed like crazy. Second, eventually one got some infection. It tasted a little sour so I passed it off as a Berliner Weiss. It worked for me and to be very honest in the heat of the day it really hit the spot. Since then I have brewed plenty but (Damn) all my beers turned out! Next time I may save the yeast cake!
tap 1 Raspberry wine
tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

Pipeline: Mulled Cider 10% ABV

http://cheesestradamus.com/ Brewers challenge!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Post #6 made 8 years ago
The question I have about sour mashing is about the mashtun and insulation. Is it important that your mash be kept in a cooler for 24-48 hours to sour, or would it work in my regular BIAB pot (an urn)? I am thinking that I could brew as normal, mash out and hoist up my bag of grain. I'll boil the wort like the normal while the spent grain sits in a bucket, then I'll clean up the pot and heat more water. I could chuck the spent grains, plus a few handfuls of fresh malt in here and leave wrapped in towels/blankets to sour.

Anything wrong with this idea? Ideas and suggestions welcome! Cheers.

Post #7 made 8 years ago
Cameron,
Where you planing to use yeast or chance that the grain would have enough bacteria to do the job? I don't like to gamble with my beer that much! The goal of a sour mash is to employ the work of Lactobaccillus delbruckii to a great extent while limiting the work of other critters such as fungi or bacteria like Acetobacter or Clostridium. You can accomplish this by pitching a live culture of Lactobaccillus, by controlling the temperature of the mash and by limiting the oxygen introduced to the mash.
Read this!
http://www.byo.com/stories/techniques/ ... techniques

Good luck!
tap 1 Raspberry wine
tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

Pipeline: Mulled Cider 10% ABV

http://cheesestradamus.com/ Brewers challenge!
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Post #8 made 8 years ago
Lots of blankets/insulation around the kettle and you should be ok. You'll get plenty of fresh bacteria off 1-2# of fresh malt. Remember, this isn't officially a sour beer but it will give you a low alcohol puckery beer that I find really refreshing. It provides a nice background to add flavors to like spices or other fruits. I've only had one go bad so far, and I am not sure if I did something different/wrong, or if it was because the original grist had oatmeal in it. But it still stunk after bottle conditioning and had a really bad taste. First dumper of mine.
Blog: http://littlehouseonthesandpit.wordpress.com/
Facebook BIAB Group: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=7 ... 978&ref=nf

Post #9 made 8 years ago
Thanks for the info both of you. I read the BYO article which of course made it seem a little more complicated. Excluding oxygen sounds like it would be tricky in my BIAB urn as I'd need 30L (A LOT) of mash to fill to the brim. I wonder about experimenting with lactic acid and, more likely, other bug strains post-primary for souring some beer. I've got a bottle of Mikkeler 'Yeast Series' Brettanomyces which I'd love to add to a big porter or old ale.
Post Reply

Return to “BIABrewer Old Hands”

Brewers Online

Brewers browsing this forum: No members and 4 guests